Print Version   Download Zip File

RUSSIA IN THE TRANSCAUCASUS OR DEMOCRACY IN A STATE OF EMERGENCY by Hikmet Hadjy-zadeh TRANSITION JOURNAL Vol.3, No4, PRAGUE, 7 MARCH 1997

Hikmet Hadjy-zadeh is one of the founders of the Popular Front of Azerbaijan. He worked as chief editor of the Popular Front Newspaper "Svoboda," he was also Deputy Prime-Minister and ambassador to Russia during the term of Elchibay's government(92-93). At present he is the head of the analytical centre of the Musavat party.

The difficulties of establishing stable democracy in Central and East European countries, freed from communism, given rise to various research works and papers on the problem. In many of these papers the authors, following the well-known philosophy that the cause of every phenomenon should be found in itself, come to the conclusion that these people are not ready for democracy. At the end of report, concerning military coup d'etat that overthrew democratically elected government of Azerbaijan (summer 1993) "Time" magazine quotes one of the citizens of Baku: "We are given freedom, but we do not know what to do with it." A similar quotation is set forth in the "Financial Times," in a report about falsification during Parliamentary elections in Azerbaijan (November 1995): "The voters say they have got freedom only they do not know what to do with it." The striking resemblance of these quotations makes me think that there is a stereotypical view at work in the thoughts of Western magazine editors. Of course we are not ready to accept the democracy as would have been desired. But to what extent? Then to what extent are our failures to establish stable democracy determined by the above unreadiness? Are not there some other reasons? Why do the scholars and observers pay so little attention to the induced instability in our countries? It is well known that tension imposed on the country from outside often results in the growth of separatism, ethnic nationalism and paternalism. Democracy cannot successfully develop in a condition of a permanent state of emergency, in which we found ourselves because of our geographical location -- we are too far from God and too near to Russia. It could be argued that western observers in trying to ignore the above issue are trying to evade the answer to the following question: "What is to be done and why don't we help them?" Of course it is so simple to say "we do nothing, because they are not ready and there is nothing to help them with." "THE EVIL IMPIRE" IS REVIVING, WHAT IS TO BE DONE? ...In the short term the main task of the West towards Russia is not to clear up the prospects of democracy in this country, but to define if Russia will become national state or restore its empire status." (Zbigneiw Brzezinski)… In 1994 public opinion in the West was seriously concerned for the first time by the fact that the democratic wave on the territory of the former USSR began to go down and the pro-imperial public attitude was intensified by the failure of the supporters of independent pro-western policy at Presidential elections in Ukraine….

TO READ FULL TXT PRESS GREEN BUTTON IN THE TOP OF THE PAGE

RUSSIA IN THE TRANSCAUCASUS OR DEMOCRACY IN A STATE OF EMERGENCY by Hikmet Hadjy-zadeh TRANSITION JOURNAL Vol.3, No4, PRAGUE, 7 MARCH 1997


1 -

All Materials From This Site Can Be Used Only For Educational Purposes
All Rights Reserved � FAR CENTRE-2002, Baku-Azerbaijan